The Best Tree for Your Garden and Climate

The Best Tree for Your Garden and Climate

The Best Tree for Your Garden and Climate!

 

Did you know there are around 70 different species of trees found in the UK?

Trees are not only beautiful, but they provide height, shade, and structure to any garden or garden. They also offer shelter to wildlife and contribute to healthier, cleaner air.

Still, this does not mean that every tree is automatically suitable for your property. Before you can choose the best tree for your garden, there are a few practical considerations to review first.

How much space do you have for your tree? How can you choose a tree that is visually interesting throughout the year? And how can you select trees that will be helpful to the local environment?

In this post, we will consider some of the best small trees for gardens, as well as some of the best fast-growing trees. Let us get started!

 

The Best Trees for Your Garden: 7 Ideas to Consider

The UK’s record-setting 44-meter beech tree may look splendid in Newtimber Hill, but it is unlikely to fit in your backyard. To help you find a more appropriately sized tree, consider one of the following species.

 

1. Dogwood (Cornus Florida)

If you want a compact tree that displays dazzling seasonal colours, look no further than the dogwood. These beauties put out pink or white bracts each spring, followed by bright orange and red during the autumn.

Dogwoods are perfect for small gardens or gardens since many species max out around 3m in height. Set up a few patio chairs beneath the branches to enjoy semi-shade during the summer months.

 

2. Weeping Willow (Salix Babylonica)

It is hard to beat the natural beauty of the delicate weeping willow tree. Their signature low branches create lovely canopies that offer lots of shade year-round.

Weeping willows do well in wet locales, which is why you will often see them beside lakes or riverbanks. They grow quickly — anywhere from 1-2.5m per year — and max out around 15m tall.

There are other varieties to consider too, including the twisted willow, goat willow, or cricket bat willow.

 

3. Alder (Alnus Glutinosa)

Would you like to plant a native, eco-friendly tree that will attract plenty of birds and insects? Alders are among the most popular tree species for gardens and gardens, and for a good reason.

The Alder tree features clusters of cone-like fruits during the winter and yellow catkins in the springtime. These offer an early source of nectar and pollen for bees, while many species of birds feed on the seeds.

Alders grow fairly quickly and reach a height between 18-25m when mature. They favour moist conditions, making them ideal for London gardens and gardens.

 

4. Blackthorn (Prunus Spinosa)

If you have ever sipped on sloe gin, you are drinking the fruits of the blackthorn tree. This thorny tree provides visual interest throughout the year and is ideal for informal hedging.

In the early spring, you will enjoy the blackthorn’s white flowers. Later in the summer, the purplish “sloes” (fruit) begin to appear. Wait until after the first frost to pick them and then make your own sloe gin at home.

Blackthorn thrives in direct sunlight and will reach a height of 6-7m. Expect to see plenty of bees, caterpillars, magpies, and other animals feeding and nesting amongst the branches.

 

5. Crab Apple (Malus Sylvestris)

Crab apple trees have an interesting history that experts still cannot pinpoint. It is the wild ancestor of cultivated apple trees and has long been associated with fertility and love.

One thing everyone can agree on, however, is their beauty — especially during the springtime. Crab apple trees put out stunning pink and white blossoms each spring. Birds and small mammals (such as badgers) love the fruit, while bees are drawn to the nectar and pollen.

Crab apples usually grow to a height of 7-9m, although they can be kept smaller with proper pruning.

6. Silver Birch (Betula Pendula)

There is a seemingly endless variety of birch trees to choose from, but the silver birch may be the best tree for your garden. Their distinctive silver-white bark is impossible to miss, as are its dainty, triangular-shaped leaves.

The silver birch is especially beautiful in the autumn months when the leaves turn a bright gold colour. Small birds love the birch tree for its seed and the various insects it hosts.

Expect your silver birch tree to reach a height of 15-20m when fully mature. It thrives in acidic or sandy soils, although it can tolerate moist conditions as well.

 

7. Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum)

Although not native to the UK, it is hard to argue the striking beauty of the Japanese maple tree. They are slow-growing and graceful, with translucent leaves that shimmer in the sunlight.

Most varieties feature a spectacular array of colours during the year, with rich reds, oranges, and purples common during the autumn. They thrive in the shade and grow well with ferns and other moisture-loving plants.

Japanese maples vary greatly in size, depending on the exact species. Dwarf maples are smaller than 1m in height, while larger varieties may reach 10m or more. If you have your heart set on a Japanese maple, you can find a varietal that will fit nicely in your garden.

 

Which Is the Best Tree for Your Garden?

The type of tree you plant in your garden is a big decision. After all, with proper maintenance and care, the tree will be there for many decades to come!

So then, which of the species listed above is the best tree for your garden? Use these suggestions to help you choose a tree that will complement your home and help the environment at the same time.

Now that you know the best trees for your front garden, the only thing left to do is plant them. You might be tempted to DIY, but this is a job best left to the pros.

Grafting Gardeners provides tree planting services for properties across London and Surrey. Find out more here or give us a call at 0208 123 7653 to ask us a question.

 


Article was written by Conner D.

Article Source: https://www.graftingardeners.co.uk/the-best-tree/

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